Advertisement

Identifying the specific associations between participation in social activities and healthy lifestyle behaviours in older adults

  • Takumi Abe
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Integrated Research Initiative for Living Well with Dementia, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan.
    Affiliations
    Integrated Research Initiative for Living Well with Dementia, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan

    Centre for Urban Transitions, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC 3122, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Satoshi Seino
    Affiliations
    Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Yui Tomine
    Affiliations
    Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Mariko Nishi
    Affiliations
    Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Toshiki Hata
    Affiliations
    Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan

    Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Applied Bioscience, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Setagaya, Tokyo 156-8502, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Shoji Shinkai
    Affiliations
    Department of Nutrition, Kagawa Nutrition University, 3-9-21 Chiyoda, Sakado City, Saitama prefecture 350-0288, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Yoshinori Fujiwara
    Affiliations
    Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Akihiko Kitamura
    Affiliations
    Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakae, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
    Search for articles by this author

      Highlights

      • The type of social activity is important in the context of healthy behaviours.
      • Participation in multiple social activities leads to engagement in healthy behaviours.
      • Our findings suggest the importance of both the type and the number of social activities.

      Abstract

      Objectives

      To examine the longitudinal association between participation in social activities and healthy lifestyle behaviours.

      Study design

      This 2-year follow-up study used data from 6168 older adults (73.5 ± 5.3 years; 49% men). We studied participation in five types of social activities at baseline: participation in volunteer, sports, hobbies, senior clubs, and neighbourhood-association groups.

      Main outcome measures

      The healthy lifestyle behaviours were physical activity (time spent walking: ≥150 min/week; or less), eating habits (dietary variety score: ≥4 points; or less), and intellectual activity (subcomponents of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence: 4 points; or less).

      Results

      In the follow-up survey, 19% of participants were physically inactive, 53% had unfavourable eating habits, and 34% had diminished intellectual activity. Multilevel modified Poisson regression analysis showed that participation in sports groups was associated with a lower relative risk (RR) of physical inactivity (RR=0.82 [0.72, 0.93]) and unfavourable eating habits (RR=0.95 [0.90, 1.00]). Participation in hobby groups reduced the RR of unfavourable eating habits (RR=0.93 [0.90, 0.97]) and diminished intellectual activity (RR=0.90 [0.85, 0.96]). Participation in volunteering was associated with a lower RR of diminished intellectual activity (RR=0.84 [0.75, 0.95]). Relative to non-participation, participating in two or more social activities was associated with a 9% (95% CI: 0.83, 1.00) lower RR for physical inactivity, a 12% (95% CI: 0.82, 0.95) lower RR for unfavourable eating habits, and a 17% (95% CI: 0.77, 0.89) lower RR for diminished intellectual activity.

      Conclusions

      Both the nature and the number of social activities determine the longitudinal effects of social participation on healthy lifestyle behaviours.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Maturitas
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

      1. World Health Organization, 2002. Active ageing: a policy framework. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2002/WHO_NMH_NPH_02.8.pdf (accessed 15 June 2020).

        • Douglas H.
        • Georgiou A.
        • Westbrook J.
        Social participation as an indicator of successful aging: an overview of concepts and their associations with health.
        Aust. Health Rev. 2017; 41: 455-462
        • Kuiper J.S.
        • Zuidersma M.
        • Oude Voshaar R.C.
        • Zuidema S.U.
        • van den Heuvel E.R.
        • Stolk R.P.
        • Smidt N.
        Social relationships and risk of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies.
        Ageing Res. Rev. 2015; 22: 39-57
        • Hikichi H.
        • Kondo N.
        • Kondo K.
        • Aida J.
        • Takeda T.
        • Kawachi I.
        Effect of a community intervention programme promoting social interactions on functional disability prevention for older adults: propensity score matching and instrumental variable analyses, JAGES Taketoyo study.
        J. Epidemiol. Commun. Health. 2015; 69
        • Kanamori S.
        • Kai Y.
        • Aida J.
        • Kondo K.
        • Kawachi I.
        • Hirai H.
        • Shirai K.
        • Ishikawa Y.
        • Suzuki K.
        • Group J.
        Social participation and the prevention of functional disability in older Japanese: the JAGES cohort study.
        PLoS ONE. 2014; 9 (–e99638): e99638
        • Croezen S.
        • Avendano M.
        • Burdorf A.
        • van Lenthe F.J.
        Social participation and depression in old age: a fixed-effects analysis in 10 European countries.
        Am. J. Epidemiol. 2015; 182: 168-176
        • Tomioka K.
        • Kurumatani N.
        • Hosoi H.
        Social participation and the prevention of decline in effectance among community-dwelling elderly: a population-based cohort study.
        PLoS ONE. 2015; 10e0139065
        • Tomioka K.
        • Kurumatani N.
        • Hosoi H.
        Association between social participation and 3-Year change in instrumental activities of daily living in community-dwelling elderly adults.
        J. Am. Geriatr. Soc. 2017; 65: 107-113
        • Abe T.
        • Nofuji Y.
        • Seino S.
        • Murayama H.
        • Yoshida Y.
        • Tanigaki T.
        • Yokoyama Y.
        • Narita M.
        • Nishi M.
        • Kitamura A.
        • Shinkai S.
        Healthy lifestyle behaviors and transitions in frailty status among independent community-dwelling older adults: the Yabu cohort study.
        Maturitas. 2020; 136: 54-59
        • Paterson D.H.
        • Warburton D.E.
        Physical activity and functional limitations in older adults: a systematic review related to Canada's Physical Activity Guidelines.
        Int. J. Behav. Nutr. Phys. Act. 2010; 7: 38
        • Milte C.M.
        • McNaughton S.A.
        Dietary patterns and successful ageing: a systematic review.
        Eur. J. Nutr. 2016; 55: 423-450https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1123-7
        • Ziegelmann J.P.
        • Knoll N.
        Future directions in the study of health behavior among older adults.
        Gerontology. 2015; 61: 469-476
        • Gao M.
        • Sa Z.
        • Li Y.
        • Zhang W.
        • Tian D.
        • Zhang S.
        • Gu L.
        Does social participation reduce the risk of functional disability among older adults in China? a survival analysis using the 2005-2011 waves of the CLHLS data.
        BMC Geriatr. 2018; 18: 224
        • Seino S.
        • Kitamura A.
        • Tomine Y.
        • Tanaka I.
        • Nishi M.
        • Nonaka K.
        • Nofuji Y.
        • Narita M.
        • Taniguchi Y.
        • Yokoyama Y.
        • Amano H.
        • Ikeuchi T.
        • Fujiwara Y.
        • Shinkai S.
        A community-wide intervention trial for preventing and reducing frailty among older adults living in metropolitan areas: design and baseline survey for a study integrating participatory action research with a cluster trial.
        J. Epidemiol. 2019; 29: 73-81
        • Seino S.
        • Tomine Y.
        • Nishi M.
        • Hata T.
        • Fujiwara Y.
        • Shinkai S.
        • Kitamura A.
        Effectiveness of a community-wide intervention for population-level frailty and functional health in older adults: a 2-year cluster nonrandomized controlled trial.
        Prev. Med. (Baltim). 2021; 149
        • Willis S.L.
        • Tennstedt S.L.
        • Marsiske M.
        • Ball K.
        • Elias J.
        • Koepke K.M.
        • Morris J.N.
        • Rebok G.W.
        • Unverzagt F.W.
        • Stoddard A.M.
        • Wright E.
        Long-term effects of cognitive training on everyday functional outcomes in older adults.
        JAMA. 2006; 296: 2805-2814
        • Wei K.
        • Nyunt M.S.Z.
        • Gao Q.
        • Wee S.L.
        • Ng T.-.P.
        Frailty and malnutrition: related and distinct syndrome prevalence and association among community-dwelling older adults: singapore longitudinal ageing studies.
        J. Am. Med. Dir. Assoc. 2017; 18: 1019-1028
        • Craig C.L.
        • Marshall A.L.
        • Sjöström M.
        • Bauman A.E.
        • Booth M.L.
        • Ainsworth B.E.
        • Pratt M.
        • Ekelund U.
        • Yngve A.
        • Sallis J.F.
        • Oja P.
        International physical activity questionnaire: 12-Country reliability and validity.
        Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 2003; 35: 1381-1395
        • Kumagai S.
        • Watanabe S.
        • Shibata H.
        • Amano H.
        • Fujiwara Y.
        • Shinkai S.
        • Yoshida H.
        • Suzuki T.
        • Yukawa H.
        • Yasumura S.
        • Haga H.
        [Effects of dietary variety on declines in high-level functional capacity in elderly people living in a community].
        Nihon. Koshu Eisei Zasshi. 2003; 50: 1117-1124
        • Kwon J.
        • Suzuki T.
        • Kumagai S.
        • Shinkai S.
        • Yukawa H.
        Risk factors for dietary variety decline among Japanese elderly in a rural community: a 8-year follow-up study from TMIG-LISA.
        Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 2006; 60: 305-311
        • Koyano W.
        • Shibata H.
        • Nakazato K.
        • Haga H.
        • Suyama Y.
        Measurement of competence: reliability and validity of the TMIG index of competence.
        Arch. Gerontol. Geriatr. 1991; 13: 103-116
        • Sakurai R.
        • Yasunaga M.
        • Murayama Y.
        • Ohba H.
        • Nonaka K.
        • Suzuki H.
        • Sakuma N.
        • Nishi M.
        • Uchida H.
        • Shinkai S.
        • Rebok G.W.
        • Fujiwara Y.
        Long-term effects of an intergenerational program on functional capacity in older adults: results from a seven-year follow-up of the REPRINTS study.
        Arch. Gerontol. Geriatr. 2016; 64: 13-20
        • Gomes G.A.
        • Reis R.S.
        • Parra D.C.
        • Ribeiro I.
        • Hino A.A.
        • Hallal P.C.
        • Malta D.C.
        • Brownson R.C.
        Walking for leisure among adults from three brazilian cities and its association with perceived environment attributes and personal factors.
        Int. J. Behav. Nutr. Phys. Act. 2011; 8: 111
        • Saito M.
        • Kondo N.
        • Aida J.
        • Kawachi I.
        • Koyama S.
        • Ojima T.
        • Kondo K.
        Development of an instrument for community-level health related social capital among Japanese older people: the JAGES project.
        J. Epidemiol. 2017; 27: 221-227
        • Rinaldi P.
        • Mecocci P.
        • Benedetti C.
        • Ercolani S.
        • Bregnocchi M.
        • Menculini G.
        • Catani M.
        • Senin U.
        • Cherubini A.
        Validation of the five-item geriatric depression scale in elderly subjects in three different settings.
        J. Am. Geriatr. Soc. 2003; 51: 694-698
        • Zou G.
        A modified Poisson regression approach to prospective studies with binary data.
        Am. J. Epidemiol. 2004; 159: 702-706
        • Umberson D.
        • Montez J.K.
        Social relationships and health: a flashpoint for health policy.
        J. Health Soc. Behav. 2010; 51: S54-S66
        • Chen W.-.L.
        • Zhang C.-.G.
        • Cui Z.-.Y.
        • Wang J.-.Y.
        • Zhao J.
        • Wang J.-.W.
        • Wang X.
        • Yu J.-.M.
        The impact of social capital on physical activity and nutrition in China: the mediating effect of health literacy.
        BMC Public Health. 2019; 19: 1713
        • Legh-Jones H.
        • Moore S.
        Network social capital, social participation, and physical inactivity in an urban adult population.
        Soc. Sci. Med. 2012; 74: 1362-1367
        • Kikuchi H.
        • Inoue S.
        • Fukushima N.
        • Takamiya T.
        • Odagiri Y.
        • Ohya Y.
        • Amagasa S.
        • Oka K.
        • Owen N.
        Social participation among older adults not engaged in full- or part-time work is associated with more physical activity and less sedentary time.
        Geriatr. Gerontol. Int. 2017; 17: 1921-1927
        • Clegg M.E.
        • Godfrey A.
        The relationship between physical activity, appetite and energy intake in older adults: a systematic review.
        Appetite. 2018; 128: 145-151
        • Taguchi A.
        • Murayama H.
        • Murashima S.
        Association between municipal health promotion volunteers’ Health literacy and their level of outreach activities in Japan.
        PLoS ONE. 2016; 11e0164612
        • Hagstromer M.
        • Ainsworth B.E.
        • Oja P.
        • Sjostrom M.
        Comparison of a subjective and an objective measure of physical activity in a population sample.
        J. Phys. Act. Heal. 2010; 7
        • Tomioka K.
        • Iwamoto J.
        • Saeki K.
        • Okamoto N.
        Reliability and validity of the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ) in elderly adults: the Fujiwara-kyo study.
        J. Epidemiol. 2011; 21
        • Montagnese C.
        • Santarpia L.
        • Buonifacio M.
        • Nardelli A.
        • Caldara A.R.
        • Silvestri E.
        • Contaldo F.
        • Pasanisi F.
        European food-based dietary guidelines: a comparison and update.
        Nutrition. 2015; 31
        • Lee A.T.C.
        • Richards M.
        • Chan W.C.
        • Chiu H.F.K.
        • Lee R.S.Y.
        • Lam L.C.W.
        Association of daily intellectual activities with lower risk of incident dementia among older Chinese adults.
        JAMA Psychiatry. 2018; 75