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Poor quality of life in Australian men: Cross-sectional associations with obesity, mobility, lifestyle and psychiatric symptoms

  • Sharon L. Brennan-Olsen
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Australian Institute for Musculoskeletal Science (AIMSS), and Department of Medicine-Western Health, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Level 3, WCHRE Building, C/-Sunshine Hospital, Furlong Road, St. Albans, Victoria 3021, Australia.
    Affiliations
    Australian Institute for Musculoskeletal Science (AIMSS), The University of Melbourne, C/-Sunshine Hospital, Furlong Road, St. Albans, Melbourne, Australia

    Department of Medicine, Western Health, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Furlong Road, Melbourne, Australia

    Institute of Health and Ageing, Australian Catholic University, Spring Street, Melbourne, Australia

    Deakin University, Ryrie Street, Geelong, Australia
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  • Julie A. Pasco
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Western Health, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Furlong Road, Melbourne, Australia

    Deakin University, Ryrie Street, Geelong, Australia
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  • Sarah M. Hosking
    Affiliations
    Australian Institute for Musculoskeletal Science (AIMSS), The University of Melbourne, C/-Sunshine Hospital, Furlong Road, St. Albans, Melbourne, Australia

    Deakin University, Ryrie Street, Geelong, Australia
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  • Amelia G. Dobbins
    Affiliations
    Deakin University, Ryrie Street, Geelong, Australia
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  • Lana J. Williams
    Affiliations
    Deakin University, Ryrie Street, Geelong, Australia
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      Highlights

      • There is a paucity of data regarding lifestyles, quality of life, and psychiatric symptoms in men.
      • Independent of age, low mobility decreases quality of life.
      • Anxiety and depression decrease quality of life.
      • Smoking and low mobility are most strongly associated with a lower quality of life.

      Abstract

      Objectives

      Despite their public health importance, little is known about associations between modifiable lifestyles, quality of life (QOL), and psychiatric symptoms in men. We investigated relationships between QOL, obesity, mobility and lifestyle in Australian men, including whether associations were mediated by anxiety and depression.

      Study design

      A cross-sectional study of 893 men (aged 24–92 yrs) participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study: an age-stratified, population-based sample of men randomly recruited from the Barwon Statistical Division (BSD), in south-eastern Australia.

      Main outcome measures

      Using a validated tool, QOL was measured in the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships and the environment. Anxiety and depression were ascertained using the Hospital Anxiety and Depressive Scale. Models were adjusted for age, clinical measures of obesity and mobility, and self-reported lifestyles, with adjustment made for anxiety and depression.

      Results

      Associations were observed between low mobility and lower psychological-related QOL (OR 0.70, 95%CI 0.53–0.93), and for smoking and low mobility with lower environment-related QOL (OR 0.48, 95%CI 0.27–0.84; OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.50–0.90, respectively). Age, anxiety and depression were independently associated with QOL in each domain.

      Conclusions

      Independent of age, anxiety and depression, smoking and low mobility showed particularly strong effects on the likelihood of men reporting a lower satisfaction with their QOL. This information will inform the design of effective and equitable health policies, the allocation of resources toward unmet needs, and the development of strategic health-related plans.

      Keywords

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