Advertisement

Can the paleolithic diet meet the nutritional needs of older people?

Published:September 13, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.09.005
      The paleolithic diet aims to emulate the dietary pattern of people of the “Old Stone Age” and is currently one of the most fashionable diets in the world. Although a few short-term studies have shown beneficial effects of this diet on biomarkers for diabetes (see [
      • Andrikopoulos S.
      The Paleo diet and diabetes.
      ]) and cardiovascular disease [
      • Jonsson T.
      • Granfeldt Y.
      • Ahren B.
      • Branell U.C.
      • Palsson G.
      • Hansson A.
      • et al.
      Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study.
      ,
      • Pastore R.L.
      • Brooks J.T.
      • Carbone J.W.
      Paleolithic nutrition improves plasma lipid concentrations of hypercholesterolemic adults to a greater extent than traditional heart-healthy dietary recommendations.
      ], studies using disease endpoints are scarce. In the absence of these studies, one way to help predict potential long term health outcomes in people following this diet, including the elderly, is to determine if it is likely to meet their nutritional needs.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Maturitas
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Andrikopoulos S.
        The Paleo diet and diabetes.
        Med. J. Aust. 2016; 205: 151-152
        • Jonsson T.
        • Granfeldt Y.
        • Ahren B.
        • Branell U.C.
        • Palsson G.
        • Hansson A.
        • et al.
        Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study.
        Cardiovasc. Diabetol. 2009; 8: 35-49
        • Pastore R.L.
        • Brooks J.T.
        • Carbone J.W.
        Paleolithic nutrition improves plasma lipid concentrations of hypercholesterolemic adults to a greater extent than traditional heart-healthy dietary recommendations.
        Nutr. Res. 2015; 35: 474-479
        • Bauer J.
        • Biolo G.
        • Cederholm T.
        • Cesari M.
        • Cruz-Jentoft A.J.
        • Morley J.E.
        • et al.
        Evidence-based recommendations for optimal dietary protein intake in older people: a position paper from the PROT-AGE study group.
        J. Am. Med. Dir. Assoc. 2013; 14: 542-559
        • Kouvari M.
        • Tyrovolas S.
        • Panagiotakos D.B.
        Red meat consumption and healthy ageing: a review.
        Maturitas. 2016; 84: 17-24
        • Lippi G.
        • Mattiuzzi C.
        • Cervellin G.
        Meat consumption and cancer risk: a critical review of published meta-analyses.
        Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol. 2016; 97: 1-14
        • Hoffman R.
        • Gerber M.
        Food processing and the Mediterranean diet.
        Nutrients. 2015; 7: 7925-7964
        • Genoni A.
        • Lyons-Wall P.
        • Lo J.
        • Devine A.
        Cardiovascular: metabolic effects and dietary composition of ad-libitum Paleolithic vs. Australian guide to healthy eating diets: a 4-week randomised trial.
        Nutrients. 2016; 8: 314-327
        • Osterdahl M.
        • Kocturk T.
        • Koochek A.
        • Wandell P.E.
        Effects of a short-term intervention with a paleolithic diet in healthy volunteers.
        Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 2008; 62: 682-685
        • Reid I.R.
        • Bristow S.M.
        Calcium fortified foods or supplements for older people.
        Maturitas. 2016; 85: 1-4
      1. B. Bates, A. Lennox, A. Prentice, et al., https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-diet-and-nutrition-survey-results-from-years-1-to-4-combined-of-the-rolling-programme-for-2008-and-2009-to-2011-and-2012 (accessed July 2016).

        • Gao X.
        • Wilde P.E.
        • Lichtenstein A.H.
        • Tucker K.L.
        Meeting adequate intake for dietary calcium without dairy foods in adolescents aged 9 to 18 years (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2002).
        J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 2006; 106: 1759-1765
        • Metzgar M.
        • Rideout T.C.
        • Fontes-Villalba M.
        • Kuipers R.S.
        The feasibility of a Paleolithic diet for low-income consumers.
        Nutr. Res. 2011; 31: 444-451
        • Bath S.C.
        • Button S.
        • Rayman M.P.
        Availability of iodised table salt in the UK – is it likely to influence population iodine intake.
        Public Health Nutr. 2014; 17: 450-454
        • Jonsson T.
        • Granfeldt Y.
        • Erlanson-Albertsson C.
        • Ahren B.
        • Lindeberg S.
        A paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease.
        Nutr. Metab. (Lond.). 2010; 7: 85-99
        • Jonsson T.
        • Granfeldt Y.
        • Lindeberg S.
        • Hallberg A.C.
        Subjective satiety and other experiences of a Paleolithic diet compared to a diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes.
        Nutr. J. 2013; 12: 105-112
        • Katz D.L.
        • Meller S.
        Can we say what diet is best for health.
        Annu. Rev. Public Health. 2014; 35: 83-103
        • Gerber M.
        • Hoffman R.
        The Mediterranean diet: health, science and society.
        Br. J. Nutr. 2015; 113: S4-S10